Consider Cross Training to Prevent Injuries

Posted on May 16, 2018. Filed under: Exercise, Healing, Health, injury, rebuild, Weightloss | Tags: , , , |

gregmonicatire2

~by Dr. Greg Steiner

Many of us find a particular sport and fall in love with it, so much in fact, that there doesn’t seem to be a need or desire to do anything else than that particular sport.  Our thoughts may be, “If I focus solely on that sport and direct all my attention towards it, I can become better at it!”  While in theory, that’s the right attitude and perseverance will surely help reach one’s ultimate goal, this thought process can actually limit our experience and long term end result.   This limitation is defined by experiencing pain from overuse of certain joints or injuries that occur.  Fortunately, injuries aren’t inevitable.  As a matter of fact, most overuse injuries can actually be prevented and a great deal of these injuries are actually re-injuries. (Re-injuries can come from inadequate recovery where the body isn’t fully healed yet). This is where cross training fits in.  It’s keeping a well roundedness to your exercise program that strengthens and works a variety of muscles instead of the just the ones benefitting from one particular sport only.

While the major benefit of cross training is injury prevention by far, it’s not the only one.  It can also help with rehabilitation too.  When an injury occurs, no athlete wants to stop working out altogether and lose any progress they’ve made so cross training and exercising different body parts can still keep up fitness and activity levels.  Here, some muscles can rest, while others recover.  You can still train somewhat even while injured.

Improved fitness and strength can also be achieved by cross training.  Because certain sports focus on a specific combination of muscles, some muscles see over use while others are neglected.  Effective cross-training will enable the use of these other muscles and strengthen them.  Think about someone who is a runner, there’s fantastic cardiovascular exercise though a lot of hard impact on the joints, but when combined with yoga, allows a stronger and more stable core to be developed and promotes suppleness, fluidity and flexibility.

Improved motivation and excitement by changing up things helps keep one from becoming bored.  Trying out a new sport brings in a nice challenge while keeping fitness fresh and differentiated.  This keeps us from being stuck in a rut or in a plateau and can help us constantly evolve and grow athletically. You can also be flexible with your training needs (if you can’t run outside due to weather, you can lift weights at the gym).

Cross training and incorporating different activities into your main sport can not only help make you a better athlete overall, but enhance focus, keep you enthusiastic about exercise, and help keep you from injuries,  Like the old saying, never keep your eggs in one basket (one sport) but diversify your interests in staying healthy and fit as well!

 

 

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Pre & Post Surgery Prep for a Quicker Recovery

Posted on March 20, 2018. Filed under: Acupuncture Information, Chiropractic, Exercise, Healing, Health, Pain, surgery | Tags: , , , , , , |

monica back exercise~By Dr. Gregory Steiner, DC, MPhil

After over 25 years as a Natural Health Practitioner, I’ve come across a multitude of patients who used Chiropractic and Acupuncture therapies to either forgo their surgery or to prepare for an upcoming procedure.  I’ve also utilized these therapies on myself pre and post for knee surgery due to years and years of martial arts, over exercising, improper techniques, poor diet and ignorance in my youth. Surgery was performed to re-implant my own cartilage back into my kneecaps. I created a protocol for the first surgery and then tweaked it two years later for the second surgery.  The results of preparation pre and post were incredible and I’ve been able to share this protocol with my patients for their own rehabilitation success.

First and foremost is the concentration on nutrition. My patients and myself included, have used proteolytic enzyme supplements to prepare the body and help reduce inflammation.  These enzymes are designed to speed up the chemical reactions in your body and speed up your own repair process.  You should also focus on a more anti-inflammatory diet and consume foods like green leafy vegetables, walnuts, avocados, and herbs like garlic and ginger, and especially turmeric.  Stay away from sugars, white flours, and fast foods while also reducing dairy products pre and post-surgery.  I also liked to sip on branch chain amino acids pre and post.

Prehab also includes exercise.  Whether it be plyometrics or weight lifting, the goal is to activate the nervous system and get it charged up.  Anesthesia from surgery affects this, they create “nerve blocks” and it can take a while before they start firing up again.  It’s not just about lifting a bunch of heavy weights but using them in a controlled manner to activate the nerves as well and fire them up.

Acupuncture combined with electrical stimulation can also help.  I’ve used general points to boost energy and decrease stress and specific master points to help reduce inflammation and increase circulation to affected areas. Chiropractic is very good especially if the upcoming surgery is joint related.  The goal here is to get the joint in the best alignment as possible prior to procedure.

Getting the mind and body ready for surgery and preparing yourself  “pre-hab” and “rehab” can result in quicker and less painful recovery helping get you back to doing what you love to do in the shortest time possible.

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Stopping Neck & Shoulder Pain

Posted on April 6, 2017. Filed under: Acupuncture Information, Aging, Chiropractic, Exercise, Healing, Health, inflammation, injury, rebuild, Neck Pain, Pain, Posture | Tags: , , , , |

dr greg neck exercises cut out

Dr. Greg shows some simple neck exercises

By Dr. Greg Steiner
CA Acupuncture & Chiropractic

Neck and shoulder pain come in many shapes and forms.  There’s the sharp & stabbing type, sometimes coming from an arthritic joint or perhaps from something as simple as bending it in the wrong direction.  Sometimes it feels like it’s a grinding sort of pain and other times it feels heavy and stiff.  Whether the neck pain is a muscular or pinched nerve type, it usually doesn’t originate just in the neck but the uppermost part of the back, where a lot of muscles are activated and connect.  In order to be thorough and correct the problem, all these areas need to be addressed and assessed.

Oftentimes, headaches are caused by neck & shoulder issues.  If the muscles in the front of the neck are spasming, it can create a headache on the side of the head.  Tight trapezius and shoulder girdle areas can refer pain up the back of the head, and at the base of the skull, the deeper layer or muscles, when contracted or spasming can irritate blood vessels or nerves and produce “migraine” symptoms.

The feeling of an electrical shock or jolt running down the arm may indicate a nerve compression of some sort while a tightness or achy pain could result from a muscle strain from training at the gym.

The type of pain itself can often help identify the problem and therapies to be used for pain relief.  Ice packs are great to help reduce sharp pain while a stiff pain can be helped with ice and then heat.  The most effective therapy I have found is a combination of both chiropractic and acupuncture.  The chiropractic adjustment can help relieve muscle tension and restore some motion on just the first visit.  Subsequent visits keep increasing that range of motion, resulting in pain relief and longer term can restore proper alignment.  Add in the use of electrical stimulation and infrared heat and spasms and tightness can be also be reduced.  Acupuncture can also give a pretty satisfying analgesic effect by helping reduce muscle tension and inflammation.

One thing that can help reduce and prevent neck & shoulder pain is to focus on mobility and correct posture.  Gentle stretching and proper movement can keep the areas flexible and lubricated.  If you sit at the computer all day with your head leaning forward and hardly move, the strained position will eventually destroy the curve of the neck.  Inflammation also occurs, and nothing seems to fit in the right place.  The ligaments are no longer in the correct position and the front muscles start to shrink (because they are always contracted) while the back of the neck muscles are over stretched and weakened.  A great deal of this can be remedied by taking breaks to gently stretch the neck & shoulders, having the computer monitor & chair at the right height, as well as sitting tall and upright with the head in alignment with the shoulders.  The earlier you catch & remedy the problem, the faster you’ll see relief and following these simple suggestions can help deter that pain from the start.

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