Why Does My Back Hurt?

Posted on February 2, 2016. Filed under: Chiropractic, Health, Joints, Pain, Posture, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

bigstock-Back-pain-14431652By Dr. Greg Steiner
CA Acupuncture & Chiropractic Clinic

There are many reasons why your back is hurting.  It could be poor posture, an injury, long term wear and tear, etc…  But the pain you are feeling, like fire shooting through your veins or the dull ache that seems constant is usually a form of inflammation.  Whether the problem stems from doing too much or too little, the result can end you up in the same place.  One of the worst things you can do is go from one extreme to another.  If you sit behind your desk all day long and then decide to go out and aggressively clean the entire yard (like shoveling mulch, pulling weeds, etc.) you could be setting yourself up for a painful injury.

Our backs have discs that are designed to cushion the bones.  When we move, those discs work like little squishy sponges.  When we move to the right, that part of the disc compresses while the other side stretches.  These discs need to ingest a certain amount of nutrients to stay healthy.

For the person who sits most of the day and doesn’t move around, the discs essentially start to starve because nutrients aren’t being circulated and they start to become brittle.  When they become brittle, they start to flake and decay and become inflamed at a quicker rate.  So by living a sedentary lifestyle and doing nothing, you can actually harm yourself even more.

For the opposite type of individuals whose career involves moving around a lot, especially those that are athletes, they too can experience problems.  For example, if a long distance runner has improper technique, the discs in their spine or “shock absorbers” can wear out faster.  Even though there is plenty of motion going on, the body is overwhelmed and can’t re-supply all the nutrients it needs quick enough to rebuild, so inflammation starts in that way as well.

Posture can also attribute to back pain.  If you take a bowling ball and hold it straight up, it’s not so hard to do, but if you keep moving it forward inch by inch, for every inch you let your arm creep forward, it will increasingly feel heavier and be harder to hold.  Imagine your head like the bowling ball with all that stress on your neck, there will probably be pain in the upper back which eventually will travel down the spine to include pain in the lower back as well.  The neck and back overwork all day long, the tissues hyper stretch out and they become inflamed and begin to hurt.

That’s why I recommend getting a checkup.  Having your posture analyzed and corrected  can help pinpoint some of the reasons you may be having back pain and help get you on the track to feeling better and reducing that back pain.

 

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Slowing the Aging Process

Posted on November 20, 2015. Filed under: Acupuncture Information, Aging, Chiropractic, Exercise, Health, Hormone, Joints, Pain, Posture, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

~ by Dr. Greg Steinerbigstock-Mature-couple-having-fun-in-co-13905050

Growing old is inevitable, but getting old shouldn’t be used as an excuse.  For those who say, “I can’t do this because I’m getting older”, that’s an insufficient answer.  You don’t have to fear aging and let it prohibit you from the things you want to do.  There are a number of things that can be done to slow the process or at the least, allow you to age well.

Many processes going on in the body effect how we age.  Circulation is one of them.  It’s similar to having narrow roads, with fewer trucks on the road making deliveries.  Circulation is our transport system for our bodie’s resources, namely oxygen and nutrition.  As we age, we have a less efficient delivery system.  Also influenced by age is mobility and elasticity.  The gradual need for reading glasses demonstrates a decrease in elasticity in eyes.  It’s kind of ironic how we age that certain things get saggy while other things stiffen up.  Hormones can also get out of whack.  Testosterone & estrogen usually become unbalanced and growth hormone, responsible for repair also decreases.  Imbalanced thyroid levels and insulin can lead us to  suffer from fatigue and other issues.  And let’s not forget about inflammation.  There is inflammation that comes from a recent injury (like breaking a toe), but there’s also inflammation from an injury from 10 years ago.  Some of this stems from scar tissue forming, which over the years becomes less elastic and reduced circulation in that area.  Natural anti-inflammatories in the body work at a slower rate so we feel pain in that particular spot.

But know this, all of those things, at least by some degree are correctable.  Stretching for elasticity and mobility is helpful, but won’t necessarily solve everything.  Due to the computer generation, people these days can barely turn their neck left or right.  It’s double the problem from what I was seeing 20 years ago.  If the neck isn’t kept flexible, it can promote shoulder pain and headaches as well.

Chiropractic can be very helpful in restoring and maintaining mobility and flexibility.  Some people stretch and stretch yet still can’t touch their toes.  Usually this indicates a ligament issue.  Their bones and spine aren’t flexing.  One of the secrets to having a bouncy, happy walk isn’t about being flexible, it’s about having your bones & ligaments moving properly.  If everything is aligned and moving correctly, and the structure is perfectly aligned, the individual has a light, bouncy walk with or without flexibility.

Diet and exercise can help circulation.  Acupuncture and herbs are also useful in promoting circulation as well as helping reduce inflammation.  If you improve the circulation, you’ve got a better supply system which can transport out the waste products.  The healthy diet can then provide the right nutrition to be transported in.  Blood tests can determine how well hormones are balanced.

Everything is tied into one another.  Just like a plate of spaghetti, if one noodle falls off, it usually takes several with it.  Just be sure to treat all the issues together as a whole rather than trying to look at each “noodle” independently.

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Is your child overworked with sports? Take the right precautions to prevent injury and keep them healthy!

Posted on October 13, 2015. Filed under: Children, Chiropractic, Exercise, Pain | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

drgregportrait1

By Dr. Gregory Steiner
CA Acupuncture & Chiropractic Clinic

Pressures to succeed are considerable where children are in multiple or select sports exercising and practicing at a fairly very high level, often 6-7 times weekly.  Every child’s body is by constitution, different, and some bodies are better suited and more adaptable for excessive exercise and muscle strain than others.  Whether it be practicing gymnastics at an elite level, working out as much as 30 hours per week or select soccer or football, the repetitive movements these children go through can begin to show on their bodies.  The trouble is that even though kids are still pliable, springy and flexible, their bodies are still growing and they still need to repair and recover.   When an individual works out and exercises, there’s always a little bit of breaking down the muscle, but then the body needs to repair itself.

Problems stem from when the demands exceed the re-cooperation.  It’s similar to taking money from the bank but not putting it back in, it’s always running on a deficit. This can be done for a while, but eventually, it needs to be paid back.

I’ve worked with many young athletes, one being a 15 year old, very talented and motivated soccer player with persistent back pain.  He had worked out so much with the same repetitive motions that finally his back gave.  His back just wouldn’t get better and it mystified a lot of people. What he had was a stress fracture on his spine.  In his case, he had to completely stop the sport for a while and then rehab it.  He eventually was able to get back to it and it fortunately wasn’t a “career ending” injury, but if he had kept on, it could’ve turned for the worse.

There’s a fine line between working and overworking.  What happens eventually is that in the early teens, those children who have worked so hard for years, start to show damage and stress patterns.  Kids are exuberant; they have a good repair capacity and if they overwork it, it’s a bit more forgiving because they are still growing.  They have growth hormone and testosterone so they’ll repair up to a point.

To fix this situation, 1st there’s evaluation.  Even kids can break.  They are not supposed to have long term pain but short term pains aren’t uncommon:  growing pains, strains & sprains, etc… But if they complain about the same area week after week, there’s most likely a problem there, possibly ligament or bone issue of some kind.  The 2nd thing to look for is crooked posture, not just the slouch, but one shoulder or one hip higher than the other.  Watch them walk and observe if one foot is out or in more than the other one.   Helping correct these things on a child may take a short amount of work, but once they’ve grown and had the issue for years, the work required to reverse it could be extensive.

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Tips for Texting to Protect Our Neck & Spine

Posted on October 7, 2014. Filed under: Children, Chiropractic, Pain, Posture | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

by Dr. Gregory Steiner
CA Acupuncture & Chiropractic Clinictexting_posture

It seems the entire world is immersed in digital media.  It has become a part of almost everything we do.  Cell phones, once considered a luxury item are now prevalent in most homes and viewed as a necessity.  Many parents see them as an important factor in keeping their kids safe by being able to contact them at any time or place.  While this solves some issues, it’s raising others…

Today’s younger generation, (toddlers to teens) are being raised with mobile devices.  Though kids’ slouching has been an ongoing issue (usually due to laziness or not knowing the proper way to sit or stand), kids today are developing terrible posture because of how they position their bodies while using these devices.  As they peer into the device, they are usually hunched over with their shoulders rolled forward, and heads down.

Poor posture can lead to constricting of the chest cavity, which in turn causes problems with blood flow and getting full deep breaths, and over time can cause a whole host of chronic health conditions.  When a person doesn’t get full enough breaths, the cardiovascular system doesn’t work at full efficiency because it’s compressed.  When proper lung capacity isn’t continuously utilized, it becomes a struggle to get deep breaths. Over the short-term, kids will most likely be tired and low on energy. But there’s more… There are nerves in the upper back that control the heart and lungs that can eventually deform.  If the spine deforms at an early age, there is constriction and the possibility of disrupting their nerve supply in the upper back which can further effects on heart, lungs and even stomach digestion.  And because there is constant tension on the neck as well, they are far more likely to develop chronic headaches.

Having the head bent forward too often can also produce ill effects.  Every inch of forward head posture places an additional 10 lbs of pressure on the muscles and joints of the neck.  Good news is that it can be corrected.  Young people can be fully corrected because the bones are still growing (usually until the early 20’s).  While the bones are still growing there is a possibility for full correction because you can literally guide the growth, But everyone can benefit with a combination of posture correction as well as chiropractic care and corrective exercises.

One thing I do in my clinic is show patients what good posture is.  When children are taught at a young age how to “stand up straight” it can virtually shape the way they carry themselves throughout life (not only with posture, but showing confidence as well!) Teach your kids an example of good posture by having them stand with their back against the wall with heels, glutes, upper back and back of head against the wall with the chin somewhat down.

And follow some of these Tips for Texting:

  • Maintain an upright posture while texting – Avoid bending your head down and rounding your shoulders
  • Hold your phone up to face level when using
  • Rest the thumbs by using alternative fingers
  • Utilize voice-to-text so you can speak you’re message that will be typed out
  • Use a neutral grip when holding the device. A neutral grip is when the wrist is straight, not bent in either direction
  • Reduce your keystrokes. More keystrokes equals more strain on your hands and thumbs—so keep your messages brief

 

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Summer Flip Flops & Back Pain

Posted on July 2, 2013. Filed under: Acupuncture Information, Chiropractic, Exercise, Pain | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

 Now that summer is upon us, it’s time to pull out the summer wardrobe which includes shoe wear.  Unfortunately, a bad pair of flat flip flops can lead to back pain symptoms and throw your whole balance off.  The foot is one of the most complex parts of the body consisting of 38 bones connected by numerous joints, muscles, tendons and ligaments and is susceptible to many stresses.  Foot problems may include pain, inflammation, or injury and many of those problems can be caused by improper footwear.  These problems can become even more pronounced for those who spend most of their time in supportive footwear during the week and then transition to flats or flip flops for the weekends.  Podiatrists recommend that flip flops and sandals be worn for more home and poolside lounging, not spending the day walking around in.

Overuse of the tendons and muscles in the toes while walking in flat soled shoes can lead to chronic inflammation of the tendons, or tendonitis.  Because the flip flop is so loose, the toes are constantly gripping in an effort to keep the shoe on the foot.  The squishy sole of the flip flop allows the foot to over pronate (roll inward) and the toes extend and flex in an attempt to control that motion.  All this contributes to strain in the ankles, calf, knees, and lower back.

Those flat cheap flip flops may seem like a bargain now, but in the long run can cause all sorts of issues.  Most flip flops alter your gait, making you take shorter steps, which can lead to pain in other areas of the body.

Some of the problems with “cheap”  flip flops include:

  • flat foot bed which are bad for archesflip flop design
  • poor support which can cause ankle injuries
  • ease of sliding of feet which can cause calluses & blisters
  • slippery and no traction when wet

And “cheap” doesn’t necessarily mean price only.  Construction is most important here.  Just because a flip flop carries a designer name, doesn’t mean it’s designed with the support you need.  When searching for flip flops, choose one with an arch support and a solid and sturdy foot bed that keeps your heels from sliding around.  It should be molded to support the “bio-mechanics” of the foot, not just a flat piece of rubber you stand on.

The American Podiatric Medical Association has several approved brands.  They suggest you check out brands by Orthaheel, Chaco, FitFlop, or Dr. Comfort.

Fortunately, there are some things you can do to help alleviate some of the pain.
1.  Get the correct pair of shoes!
2.  Lightly massage the area to help ease the pain and reduce inflammation
3.  Alternate hot and cold treatments on the affected areas
4. Manually stretch and flex the toes, balls of feet, arches and ankles
5. Consider Acupuncture treatment.

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Kids Backpacks – Preventing Injury & Pain

Posted on August 6, 2012. Filed under: Chiropractic, Pain | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

bigstock-Happy-school-kids-giving-thumb-42775159~by Dr. Gregory Steiner

The beginning of the new school year brings excitement and enthusiasm.  With that, the inevitable purchases for school supplies including those brand new back packs!  Unfortunately, overloaded, heavy and improperly worn kid’s backpacks have accounted for several thousand visits to the doctor and ER room each year.  Most of these visits can easily be avoided.  Kids should not be in pain when carrying their school books to classes each day.   The following tips serve as a great guideline in prevention for improper use of school back packs.  Use these proactive solutions to help prevent injuries:

  • Make sure the backpack is a good fit for the child.  Bigger bags encourage over filling.  Many back packs are now equipped with wheels, provided the handle extends long enough to allow the child to stand upright while pulling it.
  • Shoulder straps should be adjustable, wide and padded.
  • Never carry the pack on just one side of the shoulder.  It produces an uneven distribution of weight on one side forcing the child to lean, which can result in a pinching of the shoulder muscle causing it to not function properly and creating uncomfortable pain on one side.  Always use both shoulder straps.
  • Make sure the shoulder straps are tight enough so the pack hangs slightly below the shoulders with no more than 4 inches hanging below the waist.
  • Use waist and chest straps – it improves how the bag is positioned on the body and encourages the bag to be worn over both shoulders.
  • Doctors suggest that no one carry more than 15% of their weight in the backpack.  If a child weighs 70 lbs, they should not be carrying more than 10 ½  lbs in their pack.  No one should carry more than 25 lbs in a backpack.
  • Pack the heavier items at the bottom.  The goal here is to transfer the weight to the hips.  A backpack with compartments helps keep the load in place.

Inform kids on the importance of keeping a light backpack and to store their unnecessary items in their locker or desk.  Other options would be to keep a second set of the heavy text books at home if possible.  Don’t be afraid to discuss the issue with the teachers if the backpacks are too heavy with all the books the children are required to take home.

The downside of improper back pack use and too much weight are many.  With heavy backpacks, kids begin to lean forward and thereby throw off their natural state of balance.  Eventually, they may experience an alteration in the curve of the middle and lower back as well as increase muscle strain and irritating the spinal joints resulting in a rounding of the shoulders.  Be sure to ask your child how comfortable they feel with their loaded back packs and take notice to see if their shoulders are equally level and whether they are hunching forward.  If you’ve taken the above precautions but your child complains of pain or doesn’t stand correctly when at ease (with or without a back pack) a doctor should be consulted.

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Arthrostim-the Modern Alternative in Chiropractic Adjustments

Posted on June 12, 2012. Filed under: Chiropractic, Healing, Joints, Pain | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 

arthrostimmeganThe Arthrostim is a natural solution and revolutionary procedure that is helping hundreds of neck and back pain sufferers get out of pain safely and gently without any side effects. It is a contemporary chiropractic adjustment instrument that is an alternative to traditional manual adjustments. It was designed to gently and safely decrease the muscle and joint tension in the neck and back, thereby reducing any muscle spasm present, increasing joint movement, and eliminating any nerve pressure or irritation

How does it work?

The Arthrostim instrument works with the natural feedback cycle of the nervous system. It delivers a rapid series of controlled thrusts. These thrusts create a barrage of nervous system stimulation to the brain which can help reset dysfunctional muscular and skeletal patterns. The precise movements produced by the adjustment stimulate ‘neural receptors’ in the area which, in turn, produce nerve impulses that relay crucial information back to the brain.

It is this ‘neurological feedback system’ that the brain relies upon in order to update its awareness about the areas of the body.  Upon evaluation of changes produced by the adjustment, the brain issues self-correcting commands to the muscular system and other tissues to bring about healing changes.

There have been recent developments in new ways to produce this important neurological feedback system. The Arthrostim device is one new way of creating this valuable input. It offers the modern doctor many benefits for health-conscious people, using advanced technology to make chiropractic adjustments an enjoyable as well as a rewarding experience.

The Arthrostim instrument can deliver 1 or up to 14 rapid series recoiling thrusts per second, which works with the natural feedback cycle of the nervous system.  Because the Arthrostim oscillations are so rapid, they do not fire pain receptors so the treatment is comfortable yet highly effective. The effectiveness comes from the instruments controlled repetitive input, producing a cumulative ‘snowballing’ effect on the neural receptors. Therefore the Arthrostim, using greatly reduced forces, can create extensive neurological feedback to the brain which can help reset dysfunctional muscular and skeletal patterns.

This instrument can be used to mobilize joints of the spine and extremities and for acute muscular spasms as a way to increase muscular metabolism to release muscular contraction.

Who can use it?

Individuals that may especially benefit from the use of the Arthrostim include:

  • Infants and young children
  • Individuals in acute or chronic pain
  • Particularly sensitive individuals
  • Individuals who dislike being ‘twisted’
  • Individuals with disc or related spinal conditions
  • Individuals with arthritic conditions
  • Individuals with osteoporosis
  • Elderly individuals

Even individuals who are large and stronger (and may be difficult to adjust with a single thrust) can benefit from use of the arthrostim.

By utilizing the Arthrostim, effectiveness of the adjustment can be maintained while reducing the amount of force that is applied. This dynamic combination allows for a wide range of conditions that can be managed more comfortably by the practitioner.

What is it used for?

There are virtually no limitations to the Arthrostim; the following is a short list of potential uses:

  • Ribs blocked in a holding pattern
  • Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder
  • Deep fascial adhesions
  • Lower cervical laxity coupled with upper thoracic rigidity
  • Muscle spasms
  • Adjusting vertebrae
  • Adhesions in joints and muscles
  • Trigger points
  • Realigning of joints
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Standing Tall

Posted on October 27, 2011. Filed under: Exercise, Healing, Joints, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

by Dr. Gregory Steiner~

One of the little, silly catch-phrases we use at the clinic is “Take the Ouch! out of the Slouch.” It’s pitched at the level where everyone can remember it, and even for it’s simplistic -soundingness, there’s a lot in it.

So, let’s deal with real basics, and talk about posture from a chiropractic, mechanical and cosmetic view points.

As in so many areas of my professional life, while I learned a lot form my teachers, I’ve learned even more from the good ones and bad ones in weight training. As a general group, I would say that an unfortunate league table exists for rating how well or how badly people who lift weights wisely use their bodies natural capability. Here’s my evaluation – general impressions formed over years of watching, participating and treating men and women in all the categories.

In bottom place, bodybuilders.

In middle place, power lifters.

In absolute first place, Olympic lifters – as I’ve written many times and will do again, these people know how to stand, how to move, and how to lift great weights with great speed with impeccable co-ordination. All deserving kudos to them!

Ok, not all bodybuilders. In fact, the best ones will have learned how to balance out all main postural muscle groups in order to stand well, to present themselves in the best possible way.

Look at it this way. If you stand straight, you look better. If you stand straight, you breathe better. If you breathe better, your energy is better – and possibly your sleep. If your energy is better, you train better. You’ll have already completed the sequence – if you train better, you get bigger and stronger.

Sometimes various writers discuss posture, usually a physiotherapist, an alternative health practitioner, or another health professional. All the technicalities are good, and alternative health models that talk about releasing energy are fine as well – if they serve their purpose to motivate you to actually stand up straight – habitually. Not for an hour, or when you feel like it, but as a natural way of life.

Probably not “sexy” enough a topic to warrant much discussion in many magazines, you’ll find it’s more the authors who maintain something of the old-time physical culture approach to training that may mention or talk around the topic of posture. Bradley Steiner’s writing has a lot of this flavour – he deserves a read as well as a lot of attention, for two simple reasons. One, he walked the walk – Bradley built himself up from frailty to power and vitality by following these principles, and two, he’s has helped and inspired many, many others to do the same for many, many years. I don’t know if we have a common ancestor somewhere back there, but we share that experience, building from relative frailty to vitality and strength through training in both fitness and martial arts. Seek him out.

The physical culturists were way ahead of their time, though the word hasn’t been used much since WWII, as far as I know. So, why were they ahead of their time? For one, their philosophy from which they designed their training methods was wholistic. That word – “wholism” refers to a certain mindset on how things fit together, the emphasis in on systems. It’s one of the main reasons why wholistic practitioners have enjoyed an tremendous increase in popularity and utilisation of their methods, whether it be wholistic medical doctors, chiropractors or Alexander technique coaches.

In direct terms, the wholistic practitioner in the best sense of the word recognises how this bit connects and interacts with that bit, and how those two bits together work together to interact with the third bit. By contract, old-school medicine perceives the “person” as distinct from the body, and each part of the body as more or less distinct from the other parts. While strictly speaking in orthopedics – sorting out joints and other musculoskeletal structures there is a real use in fixing a battered knee, for example, how that knee affects the gait, and how that altered gait causes pain in the low back or neck receives little attention. In my clinic, for we assume from the start that whatever the problem, it’s connected to something else. Of it’s pain of long standing, there will almost always be some type of distortion as the body shifts to alleviate pain as best it can. If a problem is new, we look for underlying , undiscovered weaknesses or “stuck bits” that set the stage for injury, such as bent or twisted spines in muscles imbalances front and back (or agonist antagonist).

What I’m trying to do here is give some illustration of the principles in action. Physical culture expressed a philosophy enacted in total lifestyle. If I have a criticism about most of modern body building, it’s the overly narcissistic mind set that inverts priorities that lead to long life, good health and lots of energy. What I see is body-beautiful first, strength second, and health as an after thought.

Ok, we know that culture being the way it is, no one except really close family and friends really have much concern for your health, but I can equally guarantee you that every author in Hardgainer look at things the other way round, especially if they have a few years of experience and a few miles on the body. We want to stay fit and strong and looking good – forever! And it can be done.

Ok, we also know that many more people will reward you, shun you and form impressions of you, as you do of yourself – based on how you look. Your gym buddies will categorize you on your strength, and both of these are sources of real motivation.

So, what’s all this leading to? Remember what we said about some doctors looking at the body like a collection of body parts, each one with little relation to the others? And, recall how we discussed the wholistic viewpoint? Physical culture was like the wholistic way of seeing things – healthy mind, in healthy body, in a life lived according to those principles. In daily terms this meant acting and doing in ways to promote that bigger picture of health and vitality. You train hard, you train wisely, you rest well, you eat wisely- and guess what, you look fantastic as a result. Except there is an added bonus – you radiate a certain energy that others can sense, it’s part of what makes some people “naturally beautiful.”

There is some hard-edge scientific research that shows “symmetry” be a Very Big Deal in judgements of attractiveness. Muscle size is certainly part of it, but relative balance and shape counts for much more than sheer size – unless being a strength athlete is your driving goal. The point is, some of our desire for the Better Body may be biologically based, and it operates within us all the time though our exact expression of the desire can be modified according to culture and person.

As a case in point, picture any “charismatic” person you choose. How does that person stand? If you are picturing a slouch, let’s say your tastes are “unique!” The clearest examples of straight posture come from the military of course, and while the military posture can be too stiff – not at all like that of the Olympic lifters who have more “bounce and carriage,” it’s a lot more right than wrong. In my clinical experience I’ve worked enough years to track people’s posture. I rarely, rarely have seen long-term military-types develop that hunched over shuffle I see so much in either desk workers who don’t exercise, or manual workers who have strong back and weak stomachs. Rather, you can read the non-verbal communication that slouching – to the ex-military man – was and is seen as a sin with damnation as the penalty!

Believe it or not, taking postures (in conjunction with adopting facial expressions) characteristic of certain emotions generate real, measurable changes in physiology. For example, if a person assumes an angry posture and expression, heart rate and body temperature rises. If a person assumes the characteristics of fear, heart rate rises but temperature drops. So, there seems to be a direct posture – physiology connection, independent of environmental events that trigger.

So, let’s take this the other way around. If you slouch, there is more chance to feel depressed feelings. But, if you stand straight and tall, everything balanced and working well – you have much more of a chance to feel on top of your game.

In relation to training, what we’re trying to do is establish a basic level, foundational mind-body connection that let’s you know when your posture is “right.” If you can feel this, your margin of safety and future productivity in training has just increased dramatically – as well as your training longevity.

Look in a mirror – or better yet have a tailor look at you and measure you up; tailors and dress makers have an eye to rival the best health professionals. In my clinic I take digital photos of people to let them see what I see – which besides the off-balance and tilted shoulders and hips are shocked looks on patient’s faces when they recognise that being the human Tower of Pisa is not “normal.” After they accept that, we’re usually ready to get to work!

If you see a tilt, consult a sports oriented chiropractor, physio or doctor to advise you; Alexander technique practitioners do a good job as well. So, get to work and take the Ouch out of the Slouch!.

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